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Drop Spindle Tutorial

Spinning wool into yarn is a satisfying, empowering feeling, speaking as a knitter who went years without giving handspinning a second thought. I harbored skepticism about whether I was capable of creating yarn I'd want to use in my knitting, and that alone prevented me from giving it a go for years.  Save the most gifted and skilled among us, myself definitely not included in that category, most everyone will make yarn which is immediately recognizable as handspun. A slightly uneven slubby single, or a dense rope-like spin, they all wave little flags embroidered on them an obvious fact: we were not made by machine. The best advice I can give to a novice spinner: don't focus on the quality of yarn, and enjoy learning a new...

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On Making in America

Twig & Horn was founded on a simple premise: knitting notions made in America, when possible. It's no secret that making in America comes with a set of challenges, both logistically and financially. We think it's worth the challenge. Our sewing team is only a ten minute drive from our warehouses. If we have a wild idea for a new prototype, we can call our team and meet face-to-face to look over sketches and dimensions. We can hash out production problems and look over samples in our offices. All of our sewn items are dropped off in person, not by a shipping delivery service. We feel incredibly lucky to have such close contact with those who make our products possible. It's rare, and we never want to take that for granted. To keep...

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favorite stitches: The Knitted Cable Sourcebook

There are a wealth of fantastic books in the knitting world, and more than any other textile resource, I'm regularly reaching for stitch dictionaries to spurn creativity. My favorites aren't hard to spot from the bookshelf, visible by their haggard, dog eared, and sticky note filled pages. I find them excellent starting points for design work, and a fascinating insight into the mind of the author.   I'd like to regularly dig into some of my favorite stitch dictionaries here on the Twig & Horn blog, and talk about why they'll stay on my shelves for years. I recently got my hands on Norah Gaughan's Knitted Cable Sourcebook, and the only reason why it doesn't look marked and tattered is because I haven't owned it...

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An Introduction

Now that I've been working as Art Director at Twig & Horn for a few months, it's probably time for a small introduction! My name is Whitney Hayward, and I'm a photographer, handspinner, knitwear designer, and now a knitting notions creator. I spend most of my time at Twig & Horn cooking up new ideas for knitting tools and accessories and developing our new millspun yarn, Stone Wool Cormo. I learned to knit while studying abroad in Japan. My Japanese language skills were nil, and I desperately wanted to better communicate with the family I was living with in Nagoya. Kazumi, my host mother, had a huge stack of "Fun Fur" yarn and an extra set of needles, and I asked her to...

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Our Indigo Tote Bags

All of our indigo cotton totes at Twig & Horn are hand dyed by me, Whitney Hayward, before they go out to the wide world.  For our next round of dyed totes, I photographed the dyeing process, from blank canvas to finished medium blue. Our totes arrive pressed and folded from our cut/sew team in Georgia. If we were only screen printing a design without dyeing, they're perfect. All undyed cotton canvas comes with quite a bit of oil in the fibers from the weaving process, and each bag needs to be scoured to rid the fabric of those oils, so I can achieve a nice solid indigo hue. Every time I scour their bags, I feel like a monster for ruining the beautiful state...

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